Valley 3 is on the market!

Posted by aaron on August 6, 2014

We’re excited to showcase our newest property on the marketValley 3 is our third project in Seattle’s Madison Valley neighborhood along the alley between John and Thomas on 27th Ave. The modern triad is built to surpass Built Green 4* certification and features the integration of Passive House principles for maximum energy efficiency.

Its unique design includes a reclaimed brick paver pathway – salvaged from the site’s original home – which connects each of the three homes to the street, and an exposed steel beam separating single family home’s open kitchen and living space. Additional finishes include sealed concrete floors, sustainable countertops, radiant heat bathroom floors and contemporary stainless steel energy star appliances. Valley 3’s concrete and wood façade blends well with the neighborhood’s mixed traditional and contemporary design aesthetic. Each home also provides considerable outdoor amenities including a private rooftop deck with neighborhood views, and onsite parking prewired for electric car charging.

Valley 3’s airtight construction reduces heating and cooling costs by approximately 50%. For future homeowners this energy performance translates into a substantial savings on heating and cooling and an increase in thermal comfort – even on cool, damp days.

Madison Valley is known for its walkability, boasting a Walk Score of 85. Valley 3 is located steps from the Madison Valley retail corridor, great restaurants, parks, transit and a short walk to Capitol Hill’s vibrant Pike/Pine neighborhood.

Contact Janette Misic for sales and walk through information.

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Valley 3 Gearing up to Hit the Market in June

Posted by aaron on May 22, 2014

Valley 3, Cascade Built’s third project in Madison Valley is nearing completion! Comprised of three new modern 3bd/3ba homes – one 2,300 square foot single family home and two 1,750 square foot townhomes – Valley 3 is designed and built to surpass Built Green 4* certification. The homes feature airtight construction, which reduce heating and cooling costs by approximately 50%. For homeowners this translates into a considerable savings on utility bills, and significantly increased thermal comfort for its occupants – even on cool, damp days.

With a Walk Score of 85, the homes are situated adjacent to our first Madison Valley projects – Alley House and Alley House 2 – and just steps from the Madison Valley retail corridor, parks, transit and a short walk to Capitol Hill’s vibrant Pike/Pine neighborhood.

Valley 3’s green features include:

-          Built to surpass Built Green 4* certification
-          Airtight construction
-          High performance windows from Milgard
-          Healthy indoor air quality with non -toxic finishes and zero VOC paint throughout
-          State of the art energy efficient heating and venation system that maintains fresh air
-          Durable construction with long lasting, maintenance-free materials and finishes
-          Xeriscape landscaping with drought tolerant, native plants

Keep an eye out for more photos via Facebook. For purchase information, contact Remax Metro Realty.

 
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Tour Clearwater Commons this weekend!

Posted by aaron on April 25, 2014

2 bed/2 bath single family home with sound studio and green room

Clearwater Commons, Cascade Built’s first general contracting project will be a stop on this year’s Northwest Green Home Tour, an annual event that features some of greater Seattle’s most sustainable and green homes, remodels, and energy retrofits.

Clearwater Commons is a deep green ecologically-responsible community located in North Creek. We built the community’s first four properties – two townhomes and two single family homes. Each offers a plethora of sustainable features, including advanced framing, pin pile foundations, heat recovery ventilation, non-toxic finishes for healthy indoor air quality, solar panels and rain gardens for greater resource efficiency.

The tour will take place this Saturday, April 24 from 11am – 5pm. Visit the Northwest Green Home Tour website for ticket information.

“Home of the Future”: Park Passive shines on Earth Day

Posted by aaron on April 23, 2014

Our first Passive House, Park Passive in Madison Park was spotlighted by King 5’s Evening Magazine during its Earth Day broadcast.

“They teamed up with NK Architects to create a place unlike any other. One that combined the latest in sustainable building practices with cutting edge design. When they were done, they built what turned out to be Seattle’s first passive house.”

Our First Passive House Wins the National AIA Housing Award

Posted by Sloan Ritchie on April 7, 2014

We’re proud to announce that our Park Passive project, and Seattle’s first Passive House, has received the esteemed AIA National Housing Award.  The award, now in its 14th year, was established to recognize the best in housing design and promote the importance of good housing as a necessity of life, a sanctuary for the human spirit and a valuable national resource.

Park Passive was one of five homes selected for the award in the one/two family custom housing category and the only Passive House project to win. Designed by NK Architects, Park Passive demonstrates that luxury and sustainability can co-exist. As a certified Passive House the home uses 90% less energy for heating and cooling than standard built homes, resulting in significantly decreased energy consumption, improved thermal comfort, and superior indoor air quality.

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Photo Courtesy of NK Architects

The AIA’s recognition of the home showcases its “passive survivability” for its ability to capture and retain heat – even during a power outage.  High performance windows admit the sun’s heat, which is captured by a carefully crafted building enclosure, and distributed as warm fresh air by a heat recovery ventilation system.  The home maintains a comfortable average of 70 degrees, even on overcast conditions.  NK Architects balanced the vertical design with horizontal special connections into the front and side yards to expand the home’s extremely shallow floor plate. Park Passive was certified by the Passive House Academy and authorized by the Passivhaus Institut. Rob Harrison served as the Passive House consultant.

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Photo courtesy Aaron Leitz Photography

Cascade Built is currently implementing Passive House techniques employed for Park Passive on Seattle’s first Passive House townhouse project, View Haus 5 in the city’s Madison Valley neighborhood.

Upcycle Design: Integrating Salvaged Exteriors on View Haus 5

Posted by Sloan Ritchie on February 27, 2014

A Shou Sugi Ban contemporary exterior in Portland via Houzz.com

 

Construction is underway on our second Passive House project, View Haus 5. The townhomes are designed by Bradley Khouri of b9 Architects to meet Passive House Institute US standards, which radically decreases energy consumption for heating and cooling the homes, improved thermal comfort, and superior indoor air quality.

A beautiful compliment to the Passive House design is the upcycled natural salvaged cedar and softwoods that we will use for View Haus 5’s exterior cladding. Integrating this type of finish adds to the dramatic nature of the project’s modern design, and allows the aesthetic to take center stage. It also carries the bonus of natural resource preservation and reduces the project’s carbon footprint.

The product that we chose, NatureAged Weathered Timber from Green Home Solutions, is sourced from logs that have been damaged by forest fire or other forces of nature. Some of the wood is also obtained from sawmill, logging or wood processing plants.

Our application will incorporate two finishes, a burnt wood effect called Shou Sugi Ban and a naturally weathered patina. Gaining in popularity, Shou Sugi Ban is an ancient Japanese method that involves torching the wood and sealing it with oil. This process renders the wood nearly maintenance free and makes it resistant to fire, rot and pests. The expected lifespan of Shou Sugi Ban wood is more than 80 years – far more than any other type of siding product.

Check out an example of the Shou Sugi Ban burning process via Houzz.com:

Burning the wood
Dousing the wood with water
The finished product

The salvage concept isn’t foreign to Cascade Built; we salvaged existing site trees when building Park Passive. The wood was then used to create the home’s stair treads, wall paneling, and a live-edge bathroom counter top.

What do you think about using salvaged wood product?

For more information about View Haus 5 or the products that we use, contact us at info@cascadebuilt.com.

Valley 3 breaks ground

Posted by aaron on January 30, 2014

Cascade Built has broken ground on another new project in Seattle’s Madison Valley neighborhood. Designed by S+H Works Architecture & Design, Valley 3 will feature a single family home and two townhomes on a 4,800 square foot lot. The project shares the same alley with two of our earlier Madison Valley projects, Alley House 1 and Alley House 2.

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This property is in an ideal location for professionals and young families. We sought it out for its expansive valley views and walkability to the Madison Valley retail corridor, transit and Capitol Hill’s vibrant Pike/Pine neighborhood.

In keeping with our highly-efficient green building focus, Valley 3 is designed and built to a Built Green 4* certification to use considerably less energy (than code built homes) for heating and cooling. The homes will feature additional energy efficient building measures, including exterior insulation, bonus packed insulation in the walls, and heat recovery ventilators. The project’s three-story single family home will have 3 bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms, over 2,300 square feet of living space and two parking spots. The three-story townhomes will each be 1,750 square feet with 3 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms, and one parking spot. All units will have a rooftop deck with great views.

Construction is currently under way and anticipated to be completed and on the market for sale in May 2014.

Learn more about Cascade Built’s other Madison Valley projects, Alley House 1, Alley House 2 and View Haus 5.

Breaking ground on View Haus 5

Posted by aaron on January 22, 2014

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Cascade Built has broken ground on its second Passive House project, this time in Seattle’s Madison Valley neighborhood. Designed by Bradley Khouri of the award-winning b9 Architects, View Haus 5 is Seattle’s first Passive House townhome project, and is appropriately named for its five units with expansive views of the Cascade Mountains and the neighborhood. View Haus 5 was designed under the rigorous standards of the Passive House Institute US, for energy use and air infiltration, which translates into significantly decreased energy consumption, improved thermal comfort, and superior indoor air quality.

We are able to achieve this standard by creating an airtight home; incorporating densely packed insulation and remarkable windows and doors. Insulation measuring well over 12 inches thick will be placed in every wall, the roof and under the foundation. View Haus 5 will rest at a comfortable 70 degrees year-round. Temperature can be managed by opening and closing the high performance windows and doors in the warmer months, and using the heat recovery ventilator when it’s colder.

As these townhomes will rank as one of Washington State’s most energy efficient, View Haus 5 will use approximately 90% less energy compared to those built to today’s code built standards. This figure reflects normal energy consumption by a family of four, including electronics, cooking and refrigeration, clothes washing and drying, and hot water for bathing and dishwashing.

The 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom and 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom townhomes will range in size from 1,200 – 1,700 square feet and will incorporate a variety of sustainable features, including reclaimed materials and zero VOC finishes.

Construction is currently under way and anticipated to be completed and on the market for sale in August 2014.

Learn more about Cascade Built’s first high-performance Passive House project, Park Passive.

Park Passive in the New York Times

Posted by aaron on August 21, 2013

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Cascade Built’s high-performance Passive House project, Park Passive, was recently featured in the New York Times! Read the article.

Designed by NK Architects and developed by Cascade Built, Park Passive is the first certified Passive House located in Seattle. The home was certified by the Passive House Academy and authorized by the Passivhaus Institut, which sets rigorous design standards for energy use and air infiltration that translate into significantly decreased energy consumption, improved thermal comfort, and superior indoor air quality.

LEED Certification Matters

Posted by Sloan Ritchie on August 8, 2013

A response to the “should we certify” conundrum:

LEED Certification Matters

By Mona Lemoine

What was once an aspiration of a few innovators in isolated industries is
now part of our day-to-day lives. People around the country and particularly
in the Cascadia bioregion desire leadership and sustainability in how we
design, construct, operate and maintain the buildings where we live and
work. Green building has become part of our vernacular. And LEED helped us
get here.

The private sector increasingly uses LEED certification as a measure of not
only greenness, but also as a measure of overall quality. That’s why people
repeatedly certify their buildings. That’s why there are more than 17,000
LEED-certified commercial buildings covering 2.6 billion square feet (not to
mention more than 40,000 certified homes). That’s why 88 of the Fortune 100
companies use LEED. It’s this demand for efficiency and quality that drives
the demand for LEED, which has driven green building market growth from 2
percent in 2005 to 44 percent today.

With each newly certified project, LEED broadens the base for the necessary
and wide-scale transformation of our building industry. Thanks in no small
part to LEED, adoption of the  <https://ilbi.org/lbc> Living Building
Challenge is also growing, and with it, projects that bring about local
community benefits, technological advancement, growth in manufacturing,
innovative design and restoration of the environment. LEED is a tool for the
broad adoption of green building practices to reduce the social, human
health and environmental impacts of the built environment and created a
platform for true innovation in the form of the Living Building Challenge,
that aspires for not only sustainability, but the potential for every act of
construction to restore health.

The “just build green, but don’t get LEED-certified” position, presented in
The Oregonian editorial about building West Linn’s new police station, is
neither new nor surprising
<http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/2013/07/leed_certification_is_o
verrate.html
> (“LEED certification is overrated,” July 15). No matter what
the industry, there are those who do not think verification and validation
are important. The reality is that LEED is not a “designer label,” it is
third-party proof that the building owners, in this case Oregon taxpayers,
actually got the green building they paid for. It’s not impossible to build
green without LEED, it’s just unlikely that corners won’t be cut and goals
and objectives missed, which happens every day and everywhere. “Trust me”
from the architect, engineers and contractors is not good enough.
Certification cuts through the greenwashing that is so common in the market
today and ensures that buildings are designed and built to meet an accepted
rigorous standard.

The private sector increasingly uses LEED certification as a measure of not
only greenness, but also as a measure of overall quality.

And just like the employers who hire college graduates instead of applicants
who claim to have learned the same skills, the market increasingly demands
certified buildings because they are verified energy, water and cost savers.

Despite all the evidence in favor of LEED, critics continue to argue that certification is optional, to which we say: Just look at the changes in the green building industry over the past two decades and ask yourself, would today’s nearly mainstream acceptance of and demand for better, healthier, more efficient, lower-impact buildings have been possible if we committed to a “trust me” approach to delivering on these objectives? Could the market support the Living Building Challenge and the transformation toward a living future were it not for LEED?

Oregon taxpayers deserve better than “just trust me.”


Mona Lemoine is the executive director of the Cascadia Green Building Counciland vice president of education and events of the International Living Future Institute.